Press Links


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“Mantra The Unnamed Tiger I” – Bandhavgarh, India, 2009.

PREDATOR APPRECIATION: How saving lions, tigers, and polar bears could rescue ourselves.
By: Gabriel Thoumi, January 29, 2014
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“Portrait of a Polar Bear II” – Churchill, Manitoba, Canada 2004

Author & Animal Rights Activist Cyril Christo Points Out the Plight of the Polar Bear December 4th, 2013
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Speaking in Defense of a Proud and Dying Breed – The Tiger 
January 20th, 2014
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The Bones of Contention: Stopping the elephantine genocide
BY: Cyril Christo, January 13, 2014
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Author & Animal Rights Activist Cyril Christo Points Out the Plight of the African Elephant
Downtown Magazine, NYC – November 25th, 2013
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New York Takes Part in International March for Elephants
Downtown Magazine NYC – October 4th, 2013
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Marching to Save the Elephant
National Geographic – October 4th, 2013
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Butchering Nature’s Titans: Without the elephant ‘we lose an essential pillar in the ability to wonder’
BY: Jeremy Hance – MongoBay, September 12, 2013
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The Crucifix Moment – Slaughter of Innocence
Posted by Voices for Biodiversity (IZILWANE) on August 5, 2012
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BOOK REVIEW BY ZOE KRASNEY: In Predatory Light
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FILM REVIEW – Voices for Biodiversity
Izilwane.org – August 6, 2012
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 The Sanctity of Whales
BY: Cyril Christo – Izilwane.org, April 8, 2013
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Leones, Tigres y osos polares: Imagenes de grandes mamiferos al borde de la extincion
BY: Helene Celedran – 20 Minutos (Spain), October 2, 2013
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Photos: Endangered Elephants in the African Wilderness
BY: Rebecca Sacks, Photographs by Cyril Christo and Marie Wilkinson. VanityFair.com exclusive: Cyril and Marie have share some of the most striking shots from their black-and-white collection. The photographs are the result of several trips to Africa between 1998 and 2007, during which they explored the tribal natives’ relationship to nature and, in particular, the elephants.
Vanity Fair (US), July 6, 2011
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Agony and Ivory
BY: Alex Schoumatoff
Vanity Fair (US), August 2011
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BOOK REVIEW: Walking Thunder
The Photo Review (US), July, 2011 | DOWNLOAD PDF


BOOK REVIEW
Silvershotz (Australia) – October 2010
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Resurgence (UK), September 2010 “Nature Pioneers: Walking Thunder”

East Hampton/Southampton Press (US), August 10, 2010 “Large Predators at Top of Protection List” | GO TO ARTICLE

East Hampton/Southampton Press (US), April 20, 2010 “A message about the Health of our Planet” | GO TO ARTICLE

East Hampton Press/ Southampton Press (US), August 18, 2009 “Photographic Safari to Detail the Plight of the African Elephant” | GO TO ARTICLE

East Hampton Press/ Southampton Press (US), August 11, 2008 “On the Front Lines of Global Warming” | GO TO ARTICLE

Amateur Photographer (UK), Dec 12, 2009 Book Review: Walking Thunder.

Orion Magazine (US), May/June2008 “Grey Thunder.” | GO TO ARTICLE

Southampton Press (US), August 2005 “Both a song and a Prayer for a Timeless Africa”

The Times Sunday Magazine (UK), December 2004 Book Review: Lost Africa: The Eyes of Origin

THE Magazine (US), 2002 & 2005

North Atlantic Review (US), No. 16, 2005 “Native Plunder”

PasaTiempo (US), Santa Fe New Mexican, 2001 & 2002

Salt Journal (US), Fall 2001 “Letter from the Amazon: Potions and Paradise”

Salt Journal (US), Fall 2000 “Once were Hunters”

Terra Nova (US), 2000

Publication: The East Hampton Press & The Southampton Press | by Mary Cummings, Aug 18, 2009

For more than a decade, Cyril Christo and Marie Wilkinson have been waging an uphill battle against what they see as an increasingly narcissistic culture—one in which the wonders of the natural world inspire no awe and the wanton destruction of wildlife provokes no outrage.

Their weapons of choice have been both visual and verbal: stunning black and white photographs, notably those taken in remote areas of East Africa, paired with poetically powerful language in essays that celebrate the mysteries and myths of pastoral life and the animal kingdom, and warn of a desolate future without them.

In 2004, Editions Assouline published their “Lost Africa: The Eyes of Origin,” a large-format book with photographs and accompanying essay that illuminates the lives of pastoral groups whose members have long shared a harsh, if starkly beautiful, environment with Africa’s once abundant wildlife. Now they have a new book coming out this September from Merrell Press, “Walking Thunder: In the Footsteps of the African Elephant,” while another work by the well-known leader in wildlife conservation Gay Bradshaw, “Elephants on the Edge: What Animals Have To Teach Us About Humanity,” recently published by Yale University Press, features Mr. Christo’s photographs.